When a catheter breaks

Posted November 05, 2019 07:24:22 A catheter that ruptures while a patient is undergoing a procedure is a serious situation.

And a new study has found that the risk of the catheter rupturing is higher in women than in men.

Dr Emma McKeever, an associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Queensland, said the risk was highest in women with a history of high-risk conditions.

“Our findings are consistent with the literature, and suggest that there may be a gender difference in the risk associated with catheter rupture, especially in those women who have high-level risk factors,” she said.

“Women with pre-existing pelvic inflammatory disease are more likely to rupture their catheters than women without.”

Dr McKeiver and her colleagues studied the rupture rates of women with preoperatively and postoperatively high-progressive pelvic pain (HPPA) and pelvic inflammatory disorders (PID), a group of conditions that include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), cancer and fibromyalgia.

The researchers looked at the rate of rupture of women’s cathecters during and after they had surgery.

The study was published in the American Journal of Obstetric & Gynecology.

Dr Mckeiver said the women’s health was an important issue, and it was important to understand that catheckers are not only used to relieve pain, but also to relieve pelvic inflammation.

“We wanted to know if there were differences in the rates of rupture between women with the high-and low-risk groups of pre-operatively treated HPPA, and women with PID,” she told ABC Radio Melbourne.

“The results showed that there were significant differences between the groups in terms of the number of cathecks ruptured.”

Dr McGrew, who was not involved in the study, said there was a range of reasons why the catheclers rupture.

“There could be different reasons for rupture, including pelvic inflammation, pain, or other factors that can lead to rupture,” she explained.

“A large number of patients are treated with a catheptic medication to manage the pain and inflammation, and those patients are also more likely than other patients to have a history, which could contribute to the increased risk of rupture.”

This study has shown that there is a high risk of catheter-related rupture in women.

“The authors of the study were Professor Jodi Hockley, an obstetrician-gynecologist from the University College Hospital, Melbourne, and Dr Amy Jones, an assistant professor in obstetrics at the Murdoch Children’s Hospital.

The research was funded by the Queensland Health Research Institute, the Australian College of Surgeons, the National Health and Medical Research Council, and the Australian Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. “

It is certainly a problem for women, and for women with lower risk factors, because a catchet is a caty in the sense that it holds in urine, so there is potential to rupture the bladder,” she added.

The research was funded by the Queensland Health Research Institute, the Australian College of Surgeons, the National Health and Medical Research Council, and the Australian Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Topics: human-interest, health, australia